The Department of Justice (DOJ) announced this month that it obtained over $3 billion in settlements and judgments from civil fraud and false claims cases during the fiscal year ending September 30, 2019 (FY 2019). Of this total recovery, the vast majority—$2.6 billion—arose from matters related to different sectors of the healthcare industry. DOJ noted that 2019 was the tenth consecutive year that recoveries from civil healthcare fraud cases have exceeded $2 billion, indicating that the government’s enforcement efforts remain focused on allegations of fraud in the healthcare sector.

Large Recoveries Related to Drug Manufacturers & EHR

Within the healthcare industry, the government reported significant recoveries against pharmaceutical manufacturers. Insys Therapeutics paid $195 million to resolve civil False Claims Act (FCA) allegations that it paid kickbacks to induce healthcare providers to inappropriately prescribe its fentanyl product, Subsys, to their patients. This civil settlement was part of a larger global resolution of civil and criminal allegations, with Insys agreeing to pay a total of $225 million. Reckitt Benckiser Group agreed to pay $1.4 billion to resolve criminal and civil allegations related to the marketing of the addition treatment drug Suboxone, a buprenorphine product. The global resolution included a $500 million civil settlement with the federal government.

Continue Reading DOJ Announces 2019 FCA Recovery, Majority Came from Healthcare Industry

In two prior posts [Government Files Amended FCA Complaint Against Private Equity Firm and its Portfolio Company and DOJ Intervention in Healthcare Fraud Case Highlights Potential Risks for Private Equity Firms], we wrote about the Department of Justice’s (DOJ) decision to intervene in a False Claims Act (FCA) case against a compounding pharmacy and its private equity backer.

The case, Medrano v. Diabetic Care Rx, LLC, was the first time we had seen the DOJ name a private equity firm in a FCA case involving allegations of wrongdoing by one of its portfolio companies, and we noted that this should be a wake-up call to private equity firms who are actively engaged in the management and control of healthcare companies in which they invest.

The alarm rang once again in September 2019, as the DOJ announced that it reached a $21.36 million settlement with Patient Care America (PCA), the compounding pharmacy at issue in the case, two of the company’s executives and, most notably, the private equity firm Riordan, Lewis & Haden Inc. (RLH) that managed PCA on behalf of its investors.  The settlement was reached on ability to pay grounds.

Continue Reading Private Equity Firm Settles FCA Case

We wrote an article examining recent enforcement actions by the government within the long-term care industry for McKnight’s Long-Term Care News. In the article, we point out that “recent cases reinforce the notion that long-term care providers should pay particular attention to the government’s efforts to police arrangements and business practices that implicate the

On March 18, 2019, the Department of Justice (DOJ) filed an amended complaint-in-intervention in the False Claims Act (FCA) case against Diabetic Care Rx, LLC d/b/a Patient Care America (PCA); two of PCA’s executives; and the company’s private equity owner, Riordan, Lewis & Haden, Inc. (RLH).  This filing comes on the heels of a March 5 decision by the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Florida that dismissed for insufficient pleading DOJ’s FCA claim that the defendants submitted or caused the submission of false claims to TRICARE for compound prescriptions obtained through the payment of unlawful kickbacks to marketers, physicians and patients.  This case is significant and has been closely watched by the industry because it represents the first time DOJ has intervened in an FCA suit against a private equity firm alongside a healthcare portfolio company accused of submitting false claims.

Government Accused Private Equity Owner of Being Involved in Kickback Activity

This matter involves allegations that PCA paid kickbacks to marketers to target TRICARE beneficiaries for compound pain creams, scar creams and vitamins, regardless of medical necessity.  The marketers allegedly paid telemedicine physicians who prescribed the products without ever physically examining the patients, and colluded with PCA to pay many patients’ copayments to induce their acceptance of the lucrative compound drugs.  As support for its claim against RLH, as the private equity firm, the government has repeatedly cited to evidence purporting to show RLH’s material day-to-day involvement in the operations of PCA and its awareness of the facts surrounding the alleged kickback conduct.  The government has alleged that at all relevant times, RLH managed and controlled PCA through two RLH partners who also served as officers and/or directors of PCA and of two holding companies with an interest in PCA.

Continue Reading Government Files Amended FCA Complaint Against Private Equity Firm and its Portfolio Company

Download Annual Healthcare Fraud & Abuse ReviewBass, Berry & Sims is pleased to announce the release of its seventh annual Healthcare Fraud and Abuse Review. The Review, compiled by the firm’s Healthcare Fraud Task Force, is an in-depth and comprehensive review of enforcement settlements, court decisions and developments affecting the healthcare industry.

The Review is intended to assist healthcare

A recent piece of federal legislation intended to address the opioid crisis across the United States may have some unintended consequences. In attempting to prohibit “patient brokering” in the narrow context of addiction treatment and recovery centers, Congress may have unwittingly passed an unprecedented expansion of federal prosecutorial authority over payment arrangements between providers and referral sources for private-pay patients. For the reasons discussed in this blog post, any individual or entity who provides services relating to addiction treatment or recovery (as well as all clinical laboratories, regardless of whether they provide any addiction treatment or recovery services) should examine their arrangements with all referral sources for private-pay patients, even those who do not refer patients for addiction treatment or recovery services.

On October 24, 2018, the President signed into law the Substance Use-Disorder Prevention that Promotes Opioid Recovery and Treatment (SUPPORT) for Patients and Communities Act (the “SUPPORT Act”), as discussed here. The SUPPORT Act consolidated a number of opioid-related bills, including the Eliminating Kickbacks in Recovery Act of 2018 (EKRA), which was intended to address the problem of “patient brokering” in the context of treatment centers and sober homes.

Continue Reading The Eliminating Kickbacks in Recovery Act: An Unprecedented Expansion of Anti-kickback Liability to Private-Pay Referrals?

On August 2, 2018, DOJ announced that Detroit-based Beaumont Health would pay $84 million to settle claims that between August 31, 2004, and January 31, 2012, its arrangements with eight physicians violated the Anti-Kickback Statute (AKS) and the Stark Law by providing improper remuneration in the form of free or below-market value office space and employees and providing them with compensation in excess of fair market value.  The settlement agreement also settles claims that from 2006 to 2012, Beaumont misrepresented that one of its CT radiology centers qualified as an outpatient department of the hospital.  As part of the settlement, Beaumont is entering into a five-year Corporate Integrity Agreement, during which time its referral arrangements will be reviewed by an independent review organization.

Continue Reading Detroit Health System Pays $84 Million to Settle AKS/Stark Claims

The Department of Justice’s recent decision to intervene in a False Claims Act case against not only a compounding pharmacy but also the private equity firm that owns a controlling stake in it, underscores the potential risks private equity firms face when operating in the highly regulated healthcare space.  On February 16, 2018, the United States filed a complaint in intervention in Medrano v. Diabetic Care Rx, LLC, Case No. 15-62617-CIV-BLOOM, alleging the compounding pharmacy, Patient Care America (“PCA”), paid illegal kickbacks to marketing firms who targeted military members and their families for prescriptions for compounded drugs the pharmacy then created not to meet individual patient needs, but rather to maximize reimbursement from Tricare, the federal military health care program.  In a somewhat unique move, the government also named as a defendant the private equity company Riordan, Lewis & Haden Inc. (“RLH”), which manages and controls PCA through a general partner.

Continue Reading DOJ Intervention in Healthcare Fraud Case Highlights Potential Risks for Private Equity Firms

In the recent past, the government has racked up a number of FCA settlements based on alleged violations of the Anti-Kickback Statute (AKS).  This focus undoubtedly will remain a high enforcement priority.

In U.S. ex rel. Williams v. Health Management Associates Inc. and U.S. v. Atlanta Medical Center, Inc., Tenet Healthcare Corporation and two of its Atlanta-area hospitals, Atlanta Medical Center and North Fulton Hospital, agreed to pay more than $513 million to resolve civil and criminal allegations of AKS and FCA violations.  Between 2000 and 2013, Atlanta Medical and North Fulton allegedly paid prenatal clinics for referring patients, many of whom were undocumented and indigent, to its labor and delivery, postnatal and infant services.  Using sham contracts, the hospitals allegedly paid the clinics for unnecessary, duplicative or substandard translation services, which in certain cases were not actually provided.  Tenet allegedly concealed the underlying purpose of the contracts from its legal counsel and violated the terms of its previously-entered CIA with HHS-OIG, which related to a 2006 settlement for $900 million to resolve allegations of fraudulent billing and AKS violations.

Continue Reading FCA Issues to Watch: Intersection of the FCA and the Anti-Kickback Statute

The government’s FCA enforcement efforts have continued to focus on key areas concerning the pharmaceutical and medical device industries.  In fact, drug and device manufacturers accounted for nearly half of the enforcement recoveries from the healthcare industry last year.  Manufacturers also saw enforcement agencies focus on product promotion and speaker program practices, as well as alleged violations of Current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMP).

Continue Reading FCA Issues to Watch: Pharmaceutical and Device Developments