The Ninth Circuit recently revived a False Claims Act (FCA) suit against Medicare Advantage Organizations (MAOs) related to risk adjustment payments for Medicare Advantage plans in U.S. ex rel. Silingo v. WellPoint Inc. et al.  As previously discussed in this blog post, MAOs provide Medicare benefits under a capitated payment system, whereby government reimbursement is based on an individual’s risk adjustment data.  The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) increase monthly payments to MAOs when an individual’s medical diagnoses support a higher level of risk or cost of care.  Recently, both relators and the government in a number of cases have challenged the validity of diagnostic patient information utilized to support risk adjustment data, as discussed here and here.

Continue Reading Ninth Circuit Reaffirms Group Pleading Standard in FCA Cases

On September 1, 2016, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit reversed the dismissal of an FCA lawsuit by the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Wisconsin, and in doing so, evaluated the particularity required to survive a motion to dismiss under Rule 9(b) as it relates to both a relator’s obligation to plead specific claims and the specifics of the underlying fraudulent conduct at issue.

Continue Reading Seventh Circuit Rejects Specific Claims Requirement for 9(b), Maintains a High Bar for Medical Necessity Allegations

Earlier this month, the U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Tennessee dismissed a relator’s qui tam lawsuit, finding that the relator had failed to adequately allege the presentment of false claims to the government. In U.S. ex rel. Prather v. Brookdale Senior Living, Inc., the relator alleged that Brookdale submitted false claims for home health services that did not meet the technical requirements for billing under Medicare rules and regulations. Defendants argued that the allegations failed to include sufficient detail regarding the actual submission of requests for anticipated payment (RAP) claims and that the relator failed to plead the requisite legal falsity of both RAP and final episode payment claims.

Continue Reading Middle District of Tennessee Clarifies Pleading Standards for the Presentment of False Claims

In U.S. ex rel. Petratos v. Genentech, Inc., the U.S. District Court for the District of New Jersey dismissed a qui tam action claiming that Genentech underreported side effects of the widely-used cancer drug Avastin. In its opinion, the district court reiterated that the FCA is not intended to reach wrongful behavior that does not lead to a false claim or regulatory violations not tied to payment.

Relator’s complaint alleged that defendants made false submissions to the FDA by relying on patient databases that contained inadequate information about drug risks and side effects and otherwise refused to provide data regarding such risks to a Key Opinion Leader based upon defendants’ false assertion that this information was unavailable. The relator claimed that this conduct cost taxpayers “hundreds of millions of dollars,” because fewer doctors would have prescribed Avastin if defendants had provided complete and accurate information, and government payers would have reimbursed for fewer Avastin indications, for lower dosages, or not at all.

Continue Reading No FCA Liability Where There Is No False Claim – Qui Tam Suit Against Maker of Avastin Dismissed