The United States District Court for the Northern District of Texas recently released a noteworthy FCA opinion, one that includes a key ruling on the use of statistical sampling and extrapolation. In United States v. Vista Hospice Care, Inc., No. 3:07-CV-00604-M, 2016 WL 3449833 (N.D. Tex. June 20, 2016), the relator brought claims alleging, among other things, that the defendant violated the False Claims Act by certifying patients as eligible for hospice, when the patients were not terminally ill or their records lacked documentation supporting the requisite six-month life expectancy prognosis.  In deciding a motion to strike and a motion for summary judgment, the district court issued two very favorable defense rulings.

Statistical Sampling/Extrapolation

The relator relied on the expert testimony of a hospice physician, who reviewed 291 patient files and concluded that a large portion of the patients were not eligible for hospice for at least some of the days. An expert statistician, in turn, extrapolated from the physician’s testimony to conclude that defendants had submitted false claims on approximately 12,000 patients.


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There are a number of key issues that will drive the government’s enforcement efforts in the coming year and that will have a significant impact on how healthcare fraud matters are pursued by relators asserting FCA claims and are defended on behalf of healthcare providers. In the coming weeks, we will examine these issues in greater depth and why healthcare providers should keep a close eye on these issues. This week, we examine the government’s continued enforcement focus on long-term care providers.

The previous year saw the continued trend of an increasing number of FCA cases based on the theory that long-term care services (e.g., skilled nursing, home health, or hospice) provided to patients were medically unnecessary, and therefore, the healthcare provider submitted false claims in connection with those services.  See, e.g., U.S. ex rel. Hayward v. SavaSeniorCare, LLC, No. 3:11-cv-0821 (M.D. Tenn.), United States’ Consolidated Complaint in Intervention (Oct. 26, 2015); U.S. ex rel. HCR ManorCare, Inc., No. 1:09-cv-00013 (E.D. Va.), United States’ Consolidated Complaint in Intervention (April 10, 2015).


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Earlier this month, the U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Tennessee dismissed a relator’s qui tam lawsuit, finding that the relator had failed to adequately allege the presentment of false claims to the government. In U.S. ex rel. Prather v. Brookdale Senior Living, Inc., the relator alleged that Brookdale submitted false claims for home health services that did not meet the technical requirements for billing under Medicare rules and regulations. Defendants argued that the allegations failed to include sufficient detail regarding the actual submission of requests for anticipated payment (RAP) claims and that the relator failed to plead the requisite legal falsity of both RAP and final episode payment claims.
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